Our Story

Incidents, Jails and Strangers

Drin Raphlic:

Apparently there was an incident between the humans and the Winter Court last night. See what you miss when you’re grading papers? In any case, I was called to Mal Cross’s office this morning. Now, after the last time I was summoned by him…well, given who he is “summoned” isn’t the correct word. But, I digress. Our last conversation didn’t leave me feeling warm and fuzzy. It turns out he wanted me to retrieve my problem student, Ayla.

…Ayla? Alea? …Yes Ayla. Ayla Dolan.

During the “incident” the campus was shut down and the students were told to go to their designated areas, and she decided not to…and then got caught. She spent the night in the drunk-tank because the other cell was full. I think it was good for her, I’m sure she made some nice friends. Oh, dear that was catty. //Sigh//

She seemed fine when I came to get her, although the police seemed reluctant to let her go even after I paid her bail. And boy does Mal Cross owe me big, good thing I got his promise in writing. We almost got shot! Another resident of the cell tried to make a run for it in the process of “making a phone call” while Ayla and I were leaving. I made sure Ayla and I was behind cover and concealment until the weapons were put away. Poor little sod, he got a little roughed up by the police.

As we left the station I noticed that she and I were being followed by a strange male. I didn’t notice at first until I heard him cursing. Somehow he managed to trip over a fire hydrant and open it a little. He wasn’t happy about being wet, perhaps because he was a cat shifter. Now, I don’t take kindly to strange males following me. Especially if they might pose a threat to me or my students…even if they’re not my favorites, they’re mine.

I asked him why he was following us and he started spouting off some gibberish about a troll. At this time I hadn’t been informed about it. I didn’t trust him and I told him to stop following us. I also told Ayla to make a run for it if he got any closer, but that was before the male and I started speaking. I followed my verbal warning with the kind both of us would understand in the most primal fashion. I hissed. It’s not quite as impressive as Io’s but I’m a lycanthrope and he’s…well a panther. In any case it was effective and he left us alone.

When I went to Mal Cross to deliver Ayla he asked me to do him another favor. I asked him what it was first before I answered. He wanted me to go back to the jail to retrieve another student that had been there for a while and had just been noticed missing. I got suspicious. I started naming off the physical characteristic of the young man that tried to escape.

I hate it when I’m right.

I told Mal Cross about what happened at the jail and how impossible, not to mention suspicious it would be for me to go back and retrieve him. He understood and when to get the boy himself. Mal Cross can be pretty persuasive when he wants to be because he was back at the Kirk Memorial Building in no time.

As I had promised to look after Ayla, it was determined that she should go home with me to rest, at least for the night. Mal Cross had arrived with his new ward and Ayla and I were just about to leave when the strange male that had been following us entered the building. I was understandably…upset, and about ready to rip this stranger a new one—literally, when Mal Cross stepped in.

The stranger began his “introduction” with the same gibberish about a troll. Mal Cross asked him if he was referring to the incident of last night. That was new to me, so I asked Mal Cross for the whole story. What it boiled down to was the Human acting against the Winter Court and possible war and what we were going to do about it being stuck in the middle. The youngest members of our little party were unusually quite. Mal Cross and I are all for keeping the peace. Initially the stranger wasn’t, but as I said, Mal Cross can be persuasive.

Our fist act will to be sending out missives of peace to both parties.

View

I'm sorry, but we no longer support this web browser. Please upgrade your browser or install Chrome or Firefox to enjoy the full functionality of this site.